Identification and Acceptance of Dissociative Identity Disorder

By: Isabella DiStefano, FCLC ’21 Dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a complex psychological phenomenon whose existence has been heavily debated over the years. The disorder presents itself as a distinct shift between two or more unique personality states, according to DSM-V criteria (Brand et al., 2015, p. 257). This disorder is so striking, perhaps because … More Identification and Acceptance of Dissociative Identity Disorder

Public Health Framing: A Survey Experiment

By: Eliana Nowlis, FCRH ’23 Abstract The framing of a public health recommendation can dramatically impact how many people comply with it, which in turn affects public health overall. Framing is a psychological effect that causes people to have different reactions to the same information depending on how it is presented to them. This research … More Public Health Framing: A Survey Experiment

The Culture of Corn: Effects of Globalization and Free Trade on Indigenous Culture in Mexico

By: Anna Moneymaker, FCLC ’21 Abstract The goal of this research was to illuminate the friction that occurs throughout the process of globalization. Cultural differences and identity themselves become trade barriers as deep integration occurs between nations. The Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN), or Zapatistas, found enormous support across the globe and political motivation … More The Culture of Corn: Effects of Globalization and Free Trade on Indigenous Culture in Mexico

Disabled Representation in the How To Train Your Dragon Film Trilogy

By: Stevie Paige Martin, FCLC ’23 Throughout the history of television and film, the disabled community has been continuously portrayed in accordance with a selection of stereotypes. These stereotypes demonstrate both to the general non-disabled public and to the disabled community that only certain types of disabilities and certain types of people who have disabilities … More Disabled Representation in the How To Train Your Dragon Film Trilogy

COVID-19 Fears and Personality: Worry and Neuroticism Predict Coronaphobia

By: Arbi Kumi, FCLC ‘21 Abstract The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had tremendous impacts on mental health. This study examined the relationships between the Big Five personality traits, various anxiety constructs, and concerns toward the pandemic in a sample of undergraduates from a private, 4-year university in the Northeast. Participants completed an online survey in … More COVID-19 Fears and Personality: Worry and Neuroticism Predict Coronaphobia

Investigating the Link Between Blackness and Celebrity

By: Abbey Delk Dr. Brandy Monk-Payton has been fascinated by the mythic character celebrities take on in popular culture for her entire life. She was once a frequent reader of gossip rags and tabloids (before celebrity gossip moved to social media), and her thesis as a graduate student in New York University’s Media, Culture, and … More Investigating the Link Between Blackness and Celebrity

The Road to Change

By: Grace McLaughlin In the wake of George Floyd’s murder in May, racial tensions have boiled over and exploded this past summer. The Black Lives Matter movement gained momentum quickly as more Americans have recognized the need for change through action and education. Sophomore Peter Wolff’s research pertains to whether or not Fordham University generates … More The Road to Change

Behind the Decision: The Social Background Theory

By: Abbigail Ramnarine Andrew Millman is a senior at Fordham College at Rose Hill majoring in political science and minoring in English and American studies who has a strong interest in politics and the justice system’s inner workings. His interest stems beyond the classroom, as he interned with the well-known news media station, CNN. While … More Behind the Decision: The Social Background Theory